Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Exif Data

  • Uploaded January 12, 2017

Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a mental disorder characterized by an obsessive preoccupation that some aspect of one’s own appearance is severely flawed and warrants exceptional measures to hide or fix it. In BDD’s delusional variant, the flaw is imagined. If the flaw is actual, its importance is severely exaggerated. Either way, one’s thoughts about it are pervasive and intrusive, occupying up to several hours a day. The DSM-5 categorizes BDD in the obsessive–compulsive spectrum, and distinguishes it from anorexia nervosa.

A fairly common mental disorder, estimated to affect up to 2.4% of the population, BDD usually starts during adolescence, and affects men and women roughly equally. (The BDD subtype muscle dysmorphia, perceiving the body as too small, affects mostly males.) Besides thinking about it, one repetitively checks and compares the perceived flaw, and can adopt unusual routines to avoid social contact that exposes it. Fearing the stigma of vanity, one usually hides the preoccupation. Commonly unsuspected even by psychiatrists, BDD has been greatly underdiagnosed. Severely impairing quality of life via educational and occupational dysfunction and social isolation, BDD involves especially high rates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_dysmorphic_disorder

No tags for this post.

Related posts

Leave a comment